Charlie Chaplin

Born: 16 April 1889
Dead: 25 December 1977
In: Corsier-sur-Vevey, Chaplin, Corsier-sur-Vevey, Svizzera


Short description:

He was an English comic actor, filmmaker, and composer who rose to fame in the era of silent film.
He became a worldwide icon through his screen persona, "The Tramp", and is considered one of the most important figures in the history of the film industry.
His career spanned more than 75 years, from childhood in the Victorian era until a year before his death in 1977, and encompassed both adulation and controversy.
In 1919, Chaplin co-founded the distribution company United Artists which gave him complete control over his films.
His first feature-length film was The Kid (1921), followed by A Woman of Paris (1923), The Gold Rush (1925), and The Circus (1928).
He refused to move to sound films in the 1930s, instead producing City Lights (1931) and Modern Times (1936) without dialogue.
He became increasingly political, and his next film The Great Dictator (1940) satirized Adolf Hitler.
The 1940s were a decade marked with controversy for Chaplin, and his popularity declined rapidly.
He was accused of communist sympathies, while he created scandal through his involvement in a paternity suit and his marriages to much younger women.
An FBI investigation was opened, and Chaplin was forced to leave the United States and settle in Switzerland.
He abandoned the Tramp in his later films, which include Monsieur Verdoux (1947), Limelight (1952), A King in New York (1957), and A Countess from Hong Kong (1967).


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