Edgar Allan Poe

Born: 19 January 1809
Dead: 7 October 1849
In: Washington Medical College, Rancho California Road, Temecula, California, Stati Uniti


Short description:

He was an American writer, editor, and literary critic.
Poe is best known for his poetry and short stories, particularly his tales of mystery and the macabre.
He is widely regarded as a central figure of Romanticism in the United States and of American literature as a whole, and he was one of the country's earliest practitioners of the short story.
He is generally considered the inventor of the detective fiction genre and is further credited with contributing to the emerging genre of science fiction.
He was the first well-known American writer to earn a living through writing alone, resulting in a financially difficult life and career.
Poe switched his focus to prose and spent the next several years working for literary journals and periodicals, becoming known for his own style of literary criticism.
He married Virginia Clemm in 1836, his 13-year-old cousin.
In January 1845, Poe published his poem "The Raven" to instant success, but Virginia died of tuberculosis two years after its publication.
Poe and his works influenced literature around the world, as well as specialized fields such as cosmology and cryptography.
He and his work appear throughout popular culture in literature, music, films, and television.
The Mystery Writers of America present an annual award known as the Edgar Award for distinguished work in the mystery genre.


Wikipedia/other in-depth site